Democracy

Reforming Party Funding: No Silver Bullets

By: Ed Selkirk Ford

The starting gun on the next general election has yet to be fired, but party apparatchiks have already spent years fighting a hidden campaign: not over votes, but cold, hard cash. As party HQs woo the wealthy, party members across the country have … [Read more...] about Reforming Party Funding: No Silver Bullets

Institutional Incentives for Dissent? Rebellion in Parliament under First-Past-the-Post

By: Kathryn Wainfan

“It would really be simpler and more economical to keep a flock of tame sheep and from time to time drive them into the division lobbies in appropriate numbers”[1] So Christopher Hollis MP notoriously lamented in 1949 because MPs so rarely voted … [Read more...] about Institutional Incentives for Dissent? Rebellion in Parliament under First-Past-the-Post

The Dangers of Governance by Guidance

By: Kate Dewsnip

On 23 March 2020, during a televised broadcast to the nation, the Prime Minister announced the Government’s intention to impose an immediate ‘stay at home’ order on the entirety of the UK. During the broadcast it was made clear that these new … [Read more...] about The Dangers of Governance by Guidance

Does ‘no’ mean ‘not now’? Exploring the perceived legitimacy of repeat referenda

By: Kelly Shuttleworth

Referenda have been a controversial topic in the UK for the past decade and some of the most heated debate has revolved around the issue of repeating a referendum. In what circumstances is it legitimate to push for a second referendum on a topic? How … [Read more...] about Does ‘no’ mean ‘not now’? Exploring the perceived legitimacy of repeat referenda

Cracking the whip: the UK’s party control system

By: Tabitha Troughton

What to say about the UK's whipping system, apart from the fact that one of Boris Johnson's former aides has just made it the subject of what the Guardian describes as a 'Jilly Cooper-esque satire'? My research for the Constitution … [Read more...] about Cracking the whip: the UK’s party control system

The right to strike and protest

By: Dexter Govan

On Monday evening I left the Constitution Society offices and made my way amid freezing winter temperatures to Westminster. Along with a couple of thousand other people, I stood rapt opposite Downing Street and listened to speakers in opposition to … [Read more...] about The right to strike and protest

“Almost never discussed”: inside the UK whipping system

By: Tabitha Troughton

Plunging into the pond of parliamentary hierarchy, looking for loci of power, one discovers an extraordinary system. On examination it appears to be constructed of bullying, blackmail and bribery. Some of our elected representatives are, it seems, … [Read more...] about “Almost never discussed”: inside the UK whipping system

Eroding the independence of the Electoral Commission: the introduction of a government Strategy and Policy Statement

By: Sam Power

Over the last few months, there has been much ink spilled over the Elections Bill, which is currently at the Committee Stage in the House of Commons. A number of the provisions contained in the bill are, however, relatively uncontroversial. Measures … [Read more...] about Eroding the independence of the Electoral Commission: the introduction of a government Strategy and Policy Statement