Government

Legislative Wash-Up: The Passage of the Post Office Act 2024

By: Kate Dewsnip

Last month I wrote a blog discussing the constitutional implications of the Post Office Bill (now the Post Office (Horizon System) Offences Act 2024). In that blog, I argued that primary legislation was the most appropriate and … [Read more...] about Legislative Wash-Up: The Passage of the Post Office Act 2024

The Titanic Struggle over the Illegal Migration Act

By: Stuart Wallace

In 1912, the shipyard of Harland and Wolff in East Belfast produced a ship that was state of the art, a marvel of engineering, “designed to be unsinkable”. As it traversed the iceberg-laden waters of the North Atlantic on its maiden voyage at high … [Read more...] about The Titanic Struggle over the Illegal Migration Act

Is the UK Subject to a Deep State? Liz Truss and the Civil Service

By: Jai Jethwa

Politics has moved frenetically in recent weeks. There has been the appointment of a new First Minister in Scotland, the drama of England’s local elections, and, inevitably, countless headlines over the Government’s Rwanda plan as it entered the UK … [Read more...] about Is the UK Subject to a Deep State? Liz Truss and the Civil Service

The Post Office Bill: Constitutionally Unusual, but not Inappropriate

By: Kate Dewsnip

Less than a week after the broadcast of the ITV drama, Mr Bates vs. The Post Office, the Government announced new legislation intended to quash the convictions of hundreds of Post Office employees who were wrongly prosecuted and convicted of … [Read more...] about The Post Office Bill: Constitutionally Unusual, but not Inappropriate

Government by WhatsApp: a fetter on scrutiny?

By: Cassandra Somers-Joce

In March 2023, the Cabinet Office released an internal policy regulating the use of private communications channels. The policy discouraged the use of platforms such as private email, WhatsApp, or SMS for official government business. It superseded, … [Read more...] about Government by WhatsApp: a fetter on scrutiny?

Expanding Ministerial Discretion by Eroding Human Rights: the Government’s Draft Guidance on Rule 39 Injunctions

By: Jane Richards

On 17 January, the Cabinet Secretary to the Home Office sent a letter outlining the future direction of the Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill (‘the Bill’). In it, he confirmed that the proposed Guidance (‘the Guidance’) to be … [Read more...] about Expanding Ministerial Discretion by Eroding Human Rights: the Government’s Draft Guidance on Rule 39 Injunctions

The Rwanda bill: A constitutional tipping point? 

By: Stuart Wallace

Introduction In late 2023, the UK Supreme Court (UKSC) handed down their judgment in the case of R (SAA) v Secretary of State for the Home Department. In a unanimous judgment, the UKSC held that the Home Secretary’s policy that certain people … [Read more...] about The Rwanda bill: A constitutional tipping point? 

Rigorous impartiality: What has been breached in the quest for a DUP deal and why the British will regret it

By: Katy Hayward

The principle of rigorous impartiality For over twenty-five years, the government of the United Kingdom has been under an extraordinary obligation. The last two governments have failed to uphold it. As a consequence, the present condition of the … [Read more...] about Rigorous impartiality: What has been breached in the quest for a DUP deal and why the British will regret it

The pre-election period: Purdah on the dancefloor 

By: Alys Thomas

Introduction  The latest date the next UK General Election can be held is 28 January 2025. That must be called before 17 December 2024, when the Prime Minister must ask the Monarch to dissolve Parliament. The ‘pre-election period’ (previously … [Read more...] about The pre-election period: Purdah on the dancefloor