Constitutional codes

Bring on the Goats: ‘Outsider’ ministers are a good idea: their peerages are otiose

By: Nat le Roux

The unexpected resurrection of David Cameron’s political career in the closing weeks of 2023 reopened a long-standing constitutional controversy. There is a convention that all government ministers must sit in either the Commons or the Lords, … [Read more...] about Bring on the Goats: ‘Outsider’ ministers are a good idea: their peerages are otiose

Constitutional Provisions Limiting Delegated Legislation 

By: Tasneem Ghazi

This blog describes how constitutional provisions in five countries limit the use of delegated legislation. Delegated legislation in the UK is usually described as legislation that is created as a result of Parliament giving away rule-making powers … [Read more...] about Constitutional Provisions Limiting Delegated Legislation 

Cracking the whip: the UK’s party control system

By: Tabitha Troughton

What to say about the UK's whipping system, apart from the fact that one of Boris Johnson's former aides has just made it the subject of what the Guardian describes as a 'Jilly Cooper-esque satire'? My research for the Constitution … [Read more...] about Cracking the whip: the UK’s party control system

The purpose of legislative scrutiny

By: Kate Dewsnip

It is broadly accepted that parliamentary scrutiny of legislation is a ‘good’ thing and that, if possible, there should be more of it. It is also broadly accepted that it is often ineffective and wrongfully subverted. As a result, most commentaries … [Read more...] about The purpose of legislative scrutiny

Sue Gray and the Labour Party

By: Colin Talbot

The decision of Sue Gray – a Senior Civil Servant – to leave the Service and accept a job offer from the Labour Party to become Sir Keir Starmer’s Chief of Staff has sparked a great deal of controversy. All sorts of allegations have been thrown … [Read more...] about Sue Gray and the Labour Party

A fair comparison? Israel’s reforms and the UK

By: Elijah Granet

Amidst the waves of criticism of Israel’s proposed reforms to the judicial system, British constitutional scholars have had to deal with a slight sense of embarrassment. The proposals by the government of Binyamin Netanyahu have, at their … [Read more...] about A fair comparison? Israel’s reforms and the UK

Published: Climate change, the courts and the constitution

By: Josh Kimblin

The Constitution Society is delighted to announce the publication of Climate change, the courts and the constitution. In his comprehensive report, Joshua Kimblin surveys how the legal mechanisms of environmental and climate accountability have … [Read more...] about Published: Climate change, the courts and the constitution

Constitutional change is unfinished business in the UK

By: Glyndwr Cennydd Jones

Some believe that discussion of constitutional matters amounts to little more than a diversion from people’s real concerns, such as the cost-of-living crisis, jobs and the parlous state of the health service. However, it is misleading to suggest … [Read more...] about Constitutional change is unfinished business in the UK

“Almost never discussed”: inside the UK whipping system

By: Tabitha Troughton

Plunging into the pond of parliamentary hierarchy, looking for loci of power, one discovers an extraordinary system. On examination it appears to be constructed of bullying, blackmail and bribery. Some of our elected representatives are, it seems, … [Read more...] about “Almost never discussed”: inside the UK whipping system