The Constitution Society

Working to promote informed debate about constitutional reform

The Constitution Society is an independent, non-party educational foundation which works to promote informed debate about constitutional reform. We take no position on specific reform proposals but advocate better legislative standards and oppose ill-considered, piecemeal change.

Latest blog posts

Electoral pacts and the constitution: could a pact be successful?

By: Andrew Blick and Alex Walker

In the wake of last month’s elections, questions began to be asked about the prospect of an opposition electoral alliance. The Labour Party lost a number of councils and the Hartlepool by-election, suggesting it faces immense challenges in seeking to become once more a party that can win majorities in the House of Commons. Meanwhile,… [Read More…]about Electoral pacts and the constitution: could a pact be successful?

Whose Wales? The battle for Welsh devolution and nationhood, 1880 to 2020

By: Glyndwr Cennydd Jones

Glyndwr Cennydd Jones discusses the new book Whose Wales? by Gwynoro Jones and Alun Gibbard, which is available to read here. Debates regarding Home Rule, self-governance, or even independence for Wales, have inspired and enraged for well over a century. It would be too simplistic to assert that any one political party has had a… [Read More…]about Whose Wales? The battle for Welsh devolution and nationhood, 1880 to 2020

The UK government and a second Scottish independence referendum: an unsustainable paradox?

By: Ciaran Martin

Since Scotland’s votes were counted a month ago, there has been much debate about whether the results constituted a ‘mandate’ for an independence referendum. Some debated the significance, or lack of it, of the absence of a single party majority for the Scottish National Party (SNP). Others tried to aggregate the votes of parties into… [Read More…]about The UK government and a second Scottish independence referendum: an unsustainable paradox?

The English delusion

By: Stein Ringen

For better public policy, Parliament should assert itself and take control of its own business (see How Parliament would take control). But what kind of Parliament? An influential idea in political thinking is that governments need to be strong in order to deliver. That idea is influential, probably, because it seems so obvious. How can… [Read More…]about The English delusion

Official Secrets Act and Parliamentary Privilege

By: Malcolm Jack

In evidence at the joint session of the Commons  Select Committees on Science and Technology and of Health and Social Care, Dominic Cummings promised to provide confidential documents for the Committees in respect of the government’s handling of the Covid pandemic during his time at No. 10 Downing Street. The Official Secrets Act 1989 makes… [Read More…]about Official Secrets Act and Parliamentary Privilege

Latest publications

Electoral pacts and the constitution by Andrew Blick

The May elections have prompted increased interest in the idea of an electoral pact between Opposition parties, aimed at defeating the Conservatives. It seems likely that an agreed objective of this kind of a pact would be electoral reform, moving to a more proportional means of determining the composition of the House of Commons. Such… [Read More…]about Electoral pacts and the constitution by Andrew Blick

Union at the Crossroads: Can the British state handle the challenges of devolution? by Michael Kenny, Philip Rycroft and Jack Sheldon

The future of the UK Union is of increasing salience for British policy-makers. Against the backdrop of the twin crises of Brexit and coronavirus, speculation about its break-up has become widespread. Boris Johnson’s administration has so far approached the existential threat to the state it governs by adopting a notably assertive style of unionism, expressed… [Read More…]about Union at the Crossroads: Can the British state handle the challenges of devolution? by Michael Kenny, Philip Rycroft and Jack Sheldon

Climate Change and Democratic Representation by Stanley Kwong

Can Select Committees influence a company’s environmental, social and governance credentials? In this paper, Stanley Kwong examines the role of House of Commons Select Committees in scrutinising companies on their sustainability records and holding them publicly accountable. He observes that the investigative approach of Select Committees makes them well-placed to perform this function, and argues… [Read More…]about Climate Change and Democratic Representation by Stanley Kwong