The Constitution Society

Working to promote informed debate about constitutional reform

The Constitution Society is an independent educational foundation which works to promote public understanding of the UK constitution. We monitor constitutional developments and proposals for change, and assess them against core constitutional principles.  

Latest blog posts

Will it simplify or obfuscate? The Procurement Act 2023

By: Jai Jethwa

The current state of government contracting to the private sector may appear on the surface to be a niche concern. However, its significance should not be understated, with a recent HM Treasury report calculating gross spending by the Government on procurement at £393bn in 2022/23 alone. Procurement monies have historically been issued to solve the… [Read More…]about Will it simplify or obfuscate? The Procurement Act 2023

Police and Crime Commissioners need your vote next month

By: James Sweetland

It’s fair to say that the creation of elected PCCs – that’s Police and Crime Commissioners – didn’t get off to the best of starts.  Introduced under the Coalition government, these new politicians were first elected back in 2012. Prior to polling day, then CEO of the Electoral Reform Society, Katie Ghose, warned that: “Those pulling the… [Read More…]about Police and Crime Commissioners need your vote next month

The Sunlit Uplands of Rights Protection in Northern Ireland

By: Stuart Wallace

The High Court in Northern Ireland was recently asked in Dillon and Ors v Secretary of State for Northern Ireland to consider whether the Northern Ireland Troubles (Legacy and Reconciliation) Act 2023 (Legacy Act) was compatible with human rights law. The case provides some interesting insights into human rights law post-Brexit in the UK.  Dillon and Ors v Secretary… [Read More…]about The Sunlit Uplands of Rights Protection in Northern Ireland

Institutional Incentives for Dissent? Rebellion in Parliament under First-Past-the-Post

By: Kathryn Wainfan

“It would really be simpler and more economical to keep a flock of tame sheep and from time to time drive them into the division lobbies in appropriate numbers”[1] So Christopher Hollis MP notoriously lamented in 1949 because MPs so rarely voted against the party line. However, in recent decades we have seen more high-profile… [Read More…]about Institutional Incentives for Dissent? Rebellion in Parliament under First-Past-the-Post

Latest publications

Constitutional Performance: An End of Parliament Review

The United Kingdom Constitution Monitoring Group (UKCMG), established in 2020, is made up of members with practical experience and academic knowledge of the UK constitution. Its formation was driven in part by concern about declining adherence to constitutional standards and principles in the UK. Those concerns have been more than amply justified.  Since 2021 the… [Read More…]about Constitutional Performance: An End of Parliament Review

The Constitutional Status of Northern Ireland: Consent, Acquiescence, Subjugation, Indifference

A key theme in the debate about the governance of Northern Ireland is the interpretation of the concept of consent, which lies at the heart of the 1998 Belfast/Good FridayAgreement. Consent is fundamental to any stable form of government, and what was secured in 1998 was a unique accommodation of diverse views that had appeared… [Read More…]about The Constitutional Status of Northern Ireland: Consent, Acquiescence, Subjugation, Indifference