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So long, EVEL and the FTPA: one step forward, one step back?

Alex Walker
By: Alex Walker

The doctrine that the UK Parliament is sovereign and cannot bind its successors is at the heart of the UK constitution. It means that the government of the day can replace, amend or repeal with relative ease any constitutional legislation passed by … [Read more...] about So long, EVEL and the FTPA: one step forward, one step back?

Elections Bill: a modest proposal to improve the Speaker’s Committee on the Electoral Commission

By: Alistair Clark

The current Elections Bill before Parliament contains a range of measures which require careful consideration. Among the most concerning are steps which appear designed to limit the independence of the Electoral Commission. Among these are … [Read more...] about Elections Bill: a modest proposal to improve the Speaker’s Committee on the Electoral Commission

An updated Cabinet Manual is needed to maintain public trust, ethical standards and our constitution

By: Anne Taylor

Baroness Taylor of Bolton, Chair of the House of Lords Constitution Committee Documents such as the Cabinet Manual, the Ministerial Code and the Civil Service Code are an important part of the United Kingdom's constitutional framework and, … [Read more...] about An updated Cabinet Manual is needed to maintain public trust, ethical standards and our constitution

The prime minister can strengthen the system for upholding standards in government without giving up his role as the ultimate arbiter

By: Tim Durrant

The furore around Matt Hancock’s resignation. The questions about who first paid for the Downing Street flat refurbishment. The outrage that followed lobbying by former prime minister David Cameron. A series of recent events have raised questions … [Read more...] about The prime minister can strengthen the system for upholding standards in government without giving up his role as the ultimate arbiter

Something is rotten in the state of Britain: beliefs about the fairness of elections in freefall

By: Jonathan Rose

Five years ago today, the UK voted to leave the European Union. This was a significant political upset; Brexit had been officially opposed by the major parties in parliament, the Prime Minister, and a clear majority of scientific and economic … [Read more...] about Something is rotten in the state of Britain: beliefs about the fairness of elections in freefall

Electoral pacts and the constitution: could a pact be successful?

By: Andrew Blick and Alex Walker

In the wake of last month’s elections, questions began to be asked about the prospect of an opposition electoral alliance. The Labour Party lost a number of councils and the Hartlepool by-election, suggesting it faces immense challenges in seeking to … [Read more...] about Electoral pacts and the constitution: could a pact be successful?

The UK government and a second Scottish independence referendum: an unsustainable paradox?

By: Ciaran Martin

Since Scotland’s votes were counted a month ago, there has been much debate about whether the results constituted a ‘mandate’ for an independence referendum. Some debated the significance, or lack of it, of the absence of a single party majority for … [Read more...] about The UK government and a second Scottish independence referendum: an unsustainable paradox?