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Why are suspensions from the Commons on the rise?

By: Angus Brown

Since the 2019 General Election, sixteen Members of Parliament have been suspended from the House of Commons, with some suspended for up to six weeks. Of that number, three were subsequently recalled by their constituents, and one more, the MP for … [Read more...] about Why are suspensions from the Commons on the rise?

Government by WhatsApp: a fetter on scrutiny?

By: Cassandra Somers-Joce

In March 2023, the Cabinet Office released an internal policy regulating the use of private communications channels. The policy discouraged the use of platforms such as private email, WhatsApp, or SMS for official government business. It superseded, … [Read more...] about Government by WhatsApp: a fetter on scrutiny?

Answering tricky questions: Labour and Citizens’ Assemblies

By: Simon Griffiths

A few sentences in Tom Baldwin’s new 400-page biography of Keir Starmer caused quite a stir recently. They had little to do with the life of the Labour leader, and more to do with how an incoming Labour government would find solutions to … [Read more...] about Answering tricky questions: Labour and Citizens’ Assemblies

Out next week: “The City and Federalism: the UK and Germany”

By: Matthew Heathcote

Matthew Heathcote is a Constitution Society research fellow, his report “The City and Federalism: the UK and Germany” will be published next week on 18 March 2024.  Over the last year, I've had the privilege to research and write on the potential … [Read more...] about Out next week: “The City and Federalism: the UK and Germany”

Have MPs become ‘super-councillors’ when they should be legislators?

By: Peter Heaton-Jones

Members of Parliament are under scrutiny as never before. Social media, the 24-hour news cycle and the growth of restless political activism all conspire to ensure our elected representatives can never be off duty. These factors have another effect … [Read more...] about Have MPs become ‘super-councillors’ when they should be legislators?

Expanding Ministerial Discretion by Eroding Human Rights: the Government’s Draft Guidance on Rule 39 Injunctions

By: Jane Richards

On 17 January, the Cabinet Secretary to the Home Office sent a letter outlining the future direction of the Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill (‘the Bill’). In it, he confirmed that the proposed Guidance (‘the Guidance’) to be … [Read more...] about Expanding Ministerial Discretion by Eroding Human Rights: the Government’s Draft Guidance on Rule 39 Injunctions

The Political Parties, Elections and Referendums Act (PPERA) 2000

By: James Sweetland

On Thursday, voters will head to the polls in the Rochdale by-election. They’ll be voting to replace Sir Tony Lloyd, the late Labour politician who spent a remarkable 36 years as an MP, including seven representing Rochdale.  It was expected … [Read more...] about The Political Parties, Elections and Referendums Act (PPERA) 2000

Announcement: 17 new contributing writers join the Constitution Society for 2024

By: The Constitution Society

The Constitution Society is delighted to announce an expansion in its cohort of contributing writers. Now with 17 writers, we look forward to bringing you incisive and informative work on developments in the UK constitution across … [Read more...] about Announcement: 17 new contributing writers join the Constitution Society for 2024

The Rwanda bill: A constitutional tipping point? 

By: Stuart Wallace

Introduction In late 2023, the UK Supreme Court (UKSC) handed down their judgment in the case of R (SAA) v Secretary of State for the Home Department. In a unanimous judgment, the UKSC held that the Home Secretary’s policy that certain people … [Read more...] about The Rwanda bill: A constitutional tipping point?